Ocean Plastic & Sea Turtles

Hundreds of thousands of sea turtles, whales, and other marine mammals, and more than 1 million seabirds die each year from ocean pollution and ingestion or entanglement in marine debris. Marine debris is manmade waste that is directly or indirectly disposed of in oceans, rivers, and other waterways.

Most trash reaches the seas via rivers, and 80% originates from landfills and other urban sources. This waste, which is also consumed by fish and can entangle sharks and damage coral reefs, tends to accumulate in gyres (areas of slow spiraling water and low winds) and along coastlines. 

There are 5 major ocean gyres worldwide. In the Pacific Ocean, the North Pacific Gyre is home to the “Great Pacific Garbage Patch”, a large area that is approximately the size of Texas with debris extending 20 feet (6 meters) down into the water column. It’s estimated that this “plastic island” contains 3.5 million tons of trash and could double in size in the next 5 years.

Researchers have also estimated that for every 2.2 pounds (1 kilogram) of plankton in this area, there is 13.2 pounds (6 kilograms) of plastic. Common marine debris items includes things like cigarette butts, cans, plastic bags and bottles, styrofoam, balloons, lighters, and toothbrushes. Discarded or lost fishing gear such as lines, nets and buoys are especially dangerous to sea life. 

Did You Know?

  • Plastic bags are petroleum-based and do not biodegrade.
  • Sea turtles and other marine creatures mistake plastics and other garbage as food (such as jellyfish) and ingest it. This mistake causes blockages within their digestive system and eventual death. 
  • According to the US EPA, Americans use more than 380 billion plastic bags and wraps each year. It takes 12 million barrels of oil to produce this many bags.  Worldwide, as many as one trillion plastic bags are used each year. This equates to 100 million barrels of oil!  
  • Plastic toxins end up in fish, which end up on our plates, which end up inside our bodies.
  • In 2007, San Francisco was the first city in the United States to ban petroleum-based plastic bags in large markets and pharmacies.
  • Less than 5% of plastics are recycled worldwide!

What is SEE Turtles?

We're a non-profit that promotes conservation travel through wildlife tours that help protect endangered species. 

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Photo credits: Karumbe, Neil Ever Osborne